REVIEWS

REVIEWS (cont.)

What Is Lost: Jane Franklin and the Great Man Syndrome

In her Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, Jill Lepore challenges the pre-eminence of The Great Man in historical and biographical writing. She brilliantly excavates the life of Jane Franklin, youngest sister of Benjamin, mother of twelve, wife of a “bad man or a mad man,” and an avid reader whenever she could forgo housework. In a rich account of an ordinary life of struggle, failure, and occasional delight, Lepore paints a revelatory portrait of an age, inclusive of the female perspective and experience.

click here for full article


Troubled Daughters, Twisted Wives: Domestic Suspense Redux

Sarah Weinman, crime fiction connoisseur and editor of the essential new anthology Troubled Daughters, Twisted Wives: Stories from the Trailblazers of Domestic Suspense, is admirably doing her utmost to revive, restore, and reinvent the once highly-popular thriller subgenre of Domestic Suspense.

click here for full article


Up and Down the Gaza Strip with Dervla Murphy

Murphy has authored over twenty books about her travels. Now in her eighties, she spent three months in Gaza in 2011, resulting in A Month by the Sea: Encounters in Gaza, a remarkable book that paints a vivid picture of the daily lives of a wide range of Gaza’s inhabitants and provides a succinct history of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

click here for full article


That Damned Mob of Scribbling Women

Gura’s study is a thorough, fascinating, and gratifying survey of American fiction from its beginnings to the late nineteenth century — and how that fiction reflected the developing American character. His work compellingly examines the effects of liberalism and capitalism on fiction, contemplates how Americans have perceived the function and object of literature, and interrogates the effects of fiction on society and vice versa.

click here for full article


The Helens of Troy

Ruby Blondell argues dazzlingly in Helen of Troy: Beauty, Myth, and Devastation that Helen, daughter of Zeus and Leda, possessor of “the face that launched a thousand ships,” was the greatest bombshell of all time.

click here for full article


Two Ambitious Midwestern Girls: Willa Cather and Mary MacLane

Though Cather, an intensely private person, expressly wished her letters never to be published, The Selected Letters of Willa Cather is truly a gift to literature. The 564 letters — selected and brilliantly edited, annotated, and commented upon by scholars Andrew Jewell and Janis Stout — span Cather’s life from her teenage years to her death in April 1947.

click here for full article


I Died for Beauty: Dorothy Wrinch and the Cultures

In I Died for Beauty, her fascinating book about Dorothy Wrinch, one of the twentieth century’s most important and controversial mathematicians, now all but forgotten, Marjorie Senechal considers how Wrinch was driven, until her death in 1976, to pursue her scientific vision by the sheer beauty of her idea.

click here for full article


Hardly a Female in Sight: David Thomson’s The Big Screen

Midway through David Thomson’s meandering and (self-) reflective history of world cinema, The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies and What They Did to Us, he discusses British director David Lean’s classic film Brief Encounter, a “woman’s film” about an adulterous affair.

click here for full article


The Grand Adventure of Vera Caspary

Caspary’s psycho-thriller Laura (1942, republished in 2005 by Feminist Press) is a pitch-perfect detective yarn that manipulates the tropes of the genre to explore the intersection of class, crime, and sexual politics. Her plot twists are ingenious, her characters expertly drawn, and her prose style as refined and faceted as the best of Raymond Chandler.

click here for full article


Understanding the Other: Elif Shafak’s Honor

Spanning several generations, time frames, cultures, and geographies, the narrative unfolds from the viewpoints of multiple characters and seeks to discover the myriad forces and influences that lead İskender to commit such a heinous crime.

click here for full article