A nomination for a prize! Thanks ALTA! But above all, thanks Natalia, for this and so much more.

Announcing the 2018 Italian Prose in Translation Award Shortlist

The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) is delighted to announce the shortlist for the 2018 Italian Prose in Translation Award. Starting in 2015, the Italian Prose in Translation Award (IPTA) recognizes the importance of contemporary Italian prose (fiction and literary non-fiction) and promotes the translation of Italian works into English. This prize is awarded annually to a translator of a recent work of Italian prose (fiction or literary non-fiction). This year’s judges are Geoffrey Brock, Peter Constantine, and Sarah Stickney.

The award-winning book and translator for 2018 will receive a $5,000 cash prize, and the award will be announced during ALTA’s annual conference, ALTA41: Performance, Props, and Platforms, held this year in Bloomington, IN from October 31 – November 3, 2018. If you can’t join us in person, follow our Twitter (@LitTranslate) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/literarytranslators) for the announcement of the winners!

♦ Family Lexicon By Natalia Ginzburg Translated from the Italian by Jenny McPhee (NYRB Classics):

Jenny McPhee’s pellucid new translation of Natalia Ginzburg’s 1963 masterpiece, Family Lexicon, is the best English version yet of this genre-defying classic. “The places, events, and people in this book are real,” Ginzburg tells us in her famously monitory preface; “I haven’t invented a thing.” And though she calls it “the story of my family” and claims to have written “only what I remember,” she insists we read it “as if it were a novel.”

Family Lexicon

♦ The Breaking of a Wave By Fabio Genovesi Translated from the Italian by Will Schutt (Europa Editions):

Fabio Genovesi’s novel, Chi Manda Le Onde, has been skillfully translated into English by Will Schutt under the title The Breaking of a Wave. The sprawling novel with its cast of charming misfits won the Strega Prize for Young Authors in 2015. Marked by irony and tenderness, the story swirls among various perspectives.

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♦ For Isabel, A Mandala By Antonio Tabucchi Translated from the Italian by Elizabeth Harris (Archipelago Books):

Translated by Elizabeth Harris, Antonio Tabucchi’s For Isabel, A Mandala leads the reader through a “mandala of consciousness.” This novella is at once a mystery, a magical-realist fairy tale, and a travelogue.

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♦ These Possible Lives By Fleur Jaeggy Translated from the Italian by Minna Zallman Proctor (New Directions):

Fleur Jaeggy’s These Possible Lives, translated by Minna Zallman Proctor, is a book of three short but labyrinthine biographical pieces that recreate in intricate distilled detail the lives of the British literary giants Thomas De Quincey and John Keats, and the French Symbolist writer Marcel Schwob. Jaeggy, a Swiss author who writes in Italian, is a virtuoso stylist, her prose crossing genres from biographical essay to prose poem to literary criticism.

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♦ Ties By Domenico Starnone Translated from the Italian by Jhumpa Lahiri (Europa Editions):

Jhumpa Lahiri’s much-discussed love affair with the Italian language has born welcome new fruit: in her debut as a translator, she offers a stylistically and tonally assured version of Domenico Starnone’s harrowing thirteenth novel, Ties, about the effects of an affair on a Neapolitan family.

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “A nomination for a prize! Thanks ALTA! But above all, thanks Natalia, for this and so much more.

  1. Congratulations! Family Lexicon sounds like an intriguing novel/memoir.

  2. Penelope Rowlands

    Congratulations! That’s wonderful news…

    All best, Penelope Rowlands

  3. Richard Pollak

    Brava, Jenny! Take a big bow. How are things at 404? Do you ever get to Maine? We’ve moved, to 205 Spring Street in Portland. Still have a guest room. So, as we Mainers say, “You’all come, now.” Cheers, Dick

  4. Thanks Dick. We are going to take you up on that offer one of these days. We miss Maine! 404 much changed alas.

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